Random acts of craftiness – easy ribbon flower pin

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Easy ribbon flower pin

The only thing I like more than clothes are accessories – scarves, bracelets, necklaces, pins, earrings – the more the better.  I have 1 drawer in my closet dedicated just to jewelery and another to scarves and belts.   But as much as I like to update my accessories when the seasons change, I do not like to pay full price.  I don’t even like to pay half price.  And if I can make it myself, all the better.

I decided to try my hand at making a flower pin.  There are lots of tutorials on the web, but most of the ones I found involved a glue gun.  Since I am more of a hazard than handy with a glue gun, I turned to a tried and true method – needle and thread.

The pink one is for one of my favourite little girls.  She has a birthday coming up and I found her an adorable brown sweater.  I already bought her a pair of pink and brown plaid pants and the sweater will go perfectly.  But it needed a little something.  Hence the pin.

I started with about 18 inches or 1/2 metre of 1 inch pink ribbon and pink thread.  I made a little knot at one end of the ribbon and started twisting the ribbon in a circle, using the thread to tack the edges of the ribbon down.  I found it easiest to run the thread back and forth from the centre, as I twisted the ribbon.  This helped reinforce the back of the pin.  When I reached the end of the ribbon, I turned the end under and tacked it down.  I finished it off by adding a little pink pearl in the centre and gluing a small felt circle on the back.  For the time being, the pin attached with a safety pin, but I may add a proper pin back before I send it off to the birthday girl.  It looks so sweet on the sweater.  Pretty good for 68 cents worth of ribbon and about 30 minutes (I already had the pearl and the felt).

Back of the pin and felt circle

Flower pin

The black pin was a bit more expensive – $1.43 worth of ribbon and .50 for the button.  But l really like how it turned out. 

Black ribbon flower pin

One thing I learned from making the black flower is that if you are right-handed, like me, it is much easier to twist and sew in that direction, rather than trying to do it from the left side.  Going counter-clockwise (left) was a bit more time-consuming for me.   I was able to shape the “flower” by pulling the thread a little tighter on some of the stitches. A couple of times, I didn’t twist the ribbon tightly enough and it gapped a bit – I just put in a couple more stitches to hold the ribbon down.

Shaping the flower

The button has a shank on it and I passed the needle and thread back and forth through the hole in back so it didn’t wiggle too much.  I secured it  further by pulling the needle to the back of the flower and going back and forth a few more times.  I found it much easier to work with shorter lengths of thread and re-threading several times, so the thread didn’t get tangled.  It doesn’t really matter what the back looks like – it will be covered up with a felt circle (I used purple again, so this it the only piece of felt I could find). 

I found heavy satin ribbon worked best for me, but I expect organza ribbon or grosgrain would work just as well.  Since my stitches weren’t visible, I didn’t care what they looked like.  You would probably need to take a bit more care with stitching organza ribbon, so they don’t show.  I am going to experiment making a flower out of some vintage lace I bought recently at a church sale recently. 

The flower itself could be used for anything – a necklace, headband.  Easy to make, easy on the pocketbook.  And no scary glue gun accidents.

I have linked up to the following: Think Pink Sundays at Flamingo Toes ; Making Monday Marvelous at C.R.A.F.T. ; Made by You Mondays at Skip to My Lou ; Get Your Craft on Tuesday at Today”s Creative Blog; Take-a-Look Tuesdays at Sugar Bee Crafts; Wednesday Wowzers at oopsy daisy

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